Resources

This journal article uses student-level data to investigate how the college application behavior of underrepresented minorities (URMs) changed in response to the 1998 end of affirmative action in admissions at the University of California (UC). The results show that all URMs experienced a drop in their probability of admission to at least one UC campus.

Black College Leadership in PK–12 Education amplifies the research and perspectives of HBCU leaders, including four HBCU education deans, on how HBCUs help school districts optimize education for Black preschool, elementary and secondary students. Chapter 6, "HBCU's as a Pathway to Becoming a Scientist", includes the HBCU STEM Success survey work from the HBCU Core Project. 

This call to action discusses the disproportionate impact from COVID-19 on Black, Latinx and Indigenous students, who have been hardest hit by practices and policies that result in credit loss when they transfer.

This journal article uses data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study and hierarchical generalized linear modeling to examine both student- and school-level characteristics that explain variations in college enrollment among African American men and women (with Caucasians included as a contrast group). The results showed that student-level characteristics, including gender, socioeconomic status, and race, were all significant predictors of postsecondary enrollment.

This brief highlights evidence-based practices related to early college high schools that promote college and career readiness.

This journal article presents findings from a study of whether disability status and course delivery format affect course completion at a Historically Black College. The results show that students with disabilities are just as likely as peers without disabilities to complete courses, but students with disabilities were less likely to complete online versus traditionally delivered courses.

Projects

AIR is providing support for the Longitudinal Studies Branch, which is responsible for the design and operation of three national early childhood cohort studies and several longitudinal studies of middle school, high school, and postsecondary students. AIR is providing support across the full range of design and reporting activities associated with the major data collection projects and statistical studies, including study development, cognitive laboratory work, field test and national data collection activities, review of data files and data documentation, report review and development, outreach, user support, and training activities.

AIR is evaluating the implementation and impact of the New Tech Network’s (NTN) partnership with 10 high schools in Texas, which is intended to improve student advising during the transition to college. The goals of this evaluation are to help NTN address any implementation issues and determine the effectiveness of their revised advising practices.

Researchers at the Regional Educational Laboratory Southwest, operated by AIR, in collaboration with the New Mexico Public Education Department, conducted a study to examine outcomes for several cohorts of students in New Mexico required to meet increased math and science course requirements and to take a new graduation exam. The aims of the study were to examine student outcomes among four years of cohorts before and after the changes in high school graduation requirements were implemented.

AIR is conducting a 50-month research and evaluation project of 29 institutions and two state systems to enhance the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s and the broader field’s understanding of the institutional transformation process. The goal of the project is to share findings and results from institutional-level and cross-case data related to what catalyzes the transformation process at an institution, the key components of effective models of transformation, how stakeholders are engaged in the transformation process, the timeline for seeing visible changes in institutional and student outcomes, and the risks to transformation.