Resources

This journal article provides a review of causes and policy solutions of two equity problems: (a) Too many college students from disadvantaged backgrounds in the United States do not complete their coursework with any college credential, whereas others earn degrees or certificates with little labor market value; and (b) many of these students also struggle to pay for college, and some incur debts that they have difficulty repaying. Solutions include those focused on both individual students and institutional reform.

This blog post uses newly released provisional data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System’s (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment (EF) survey to provide an updated look at whether beginning college students are attending school in their home state or heading elsewhere.

This journal article investigates the research and policy implications of test optional practices, considering both sides of the debate. Drawing on the expertise of higher education researchers, admissions officers, enrollment managers, and policy professionals, it provides a much-needed evaluation of the use and value of standardized admissions tests in an era of widespread grade inflation.

AIR’s Dr. Rachel Dinkes joined panelists from academia, policymaking, and the U.S. higher education system to discuss who should foot the bill as postsecondary education expands in the United States.

This journal article discusses a study investigating the short- and longterm impacts of "GO Centers," a student-run, college information program that provides information about all aspects of the college-going process to academically prepared Texas public school students on the margin of attending college. The results indicate that GO Centers led to a large increase in college application rates and a small increase in college enrollment rates but no increase in college completion rates.

In this video, our research teams discuss the benefits of participating in the College Completion Network, with a focus on how collaborating with fellow researchers and higher education practitioners is helping the teams provide high-quality, actionable evidence that can help move the dial on college completion.

In this journal article, researchers estimate the effects of Washington’s College Bound Scholarship program on students’ high school grades, high school graduation, juvenile detention and rehabilitation, and incarceration in state prison during high school or early adulthood. The findings indicate insignificant and substantively small or negative effects on these outcomes, calling into question the rationale for such early commitment programs.

This journal article uses data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study and hierarchical generalized linear modeling to examine both student- and school-level characteristics that explain variations in college enrollment among African American men and women (with Caucasians included as a contrast group). The results showed that student-level characteristics, including gender, socioeconomic status, and race, were all significant predictors of postsecondary enrollment.

This journal article uses student-level data to investigate how the college application behavior of underrepresented minorities (URMs) changed in response to the 1998 end of affirmative action in admissions at the University of California (UC). The results show that all URMs experienced a drop in their probability of admission to at least one UC campus.

This journal article discusses a qualitative study of a college coach program introduced in 12 nonselective Chicago Public Schools in fall 2004. It describes how the coach program works and analyzes key aspects that may explain its positive relationship with college enrollment outcomes.