Resources

In this journal article, researchers discuss findings from a study investigating the effect of students losing merit-based HOPE scholarships midway through college. The findings suggest that losing one’s scholarship results in a small degree of detachment from college and a rise in earnings of about 14 cents per dollar of lost aid but no affect on timely degree completion.

This journal article discusses a study investigating the short- and longterm impacts of "GO Centers," a student-run, college information program that provides information about all aspects of the college-going process to academically prepared Texas public school students on the margin of attending college. The results indicate that GO Centers led to a large increase in college application rates and a small increase in college enrollment rates but no increase in college completion rates.

This journal article discusses a study that used data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System and the Delta Cost Project to identify institutional predictors of bachelor’s degree completion rates for Pell Grant recipients and nonrecipients at public and private not-for-profit 4-year institutions. The results suggest that Pell Grant recipients are relatively concentrated in institutions with demographic and structural characteristics associated with lower completion rates, including lower SAT scores, enrollment, and residential intensity.

This journal article discusses findings from a study in which researchers developed a machine learning classifier to predict nontraditional student dropout.

This journal article uses student-level data to investigate how the college application behavior of underrepresented minorities (URMs) changed in response to the 1998 end of affirmative action in admissions at the University of California (UC). The results show that all URMs experienced a drop in their probability of admission to at least one UC campus.

This call to action discusses the disproportionate impact from COVID-19 on Black, Latinx and Indigenous students, who have been hardest hit by practices and policies that result in credit loss when they transfer.

This journal article uses longitudinal data from Washington state to investigate the relationships among career and technical education (CTE) enrollment, inclusion in general education, and high school and postsecondary outcomes for students with learning disabilities. Researchers replicated earlier findings that students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in a "concentration" of CTE courses had higher rates of employment after graduation than observably similar students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in fewer CTE courses.

This blog post uses newly released provisional data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System’s (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment (EF) survey to provide an updated look at whether beginning college students are attending school in their home state or heading elsewhere.

This journal article uses data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study and hierarchical generalized linear modeling to examine both student- and school-level characteristics that explain variations in college enrollment among African American men and women (with Caucasians included as a contrast group). The results showed that student-level characteristics, including gender, socioeconomic status, and race, were all significant predictors of postsecondary enrollment.

This report identifies type of high school enrollment (e.g., traditional public schools, charter schools, and private voucher schools) for Indiana students enrolled in grade 9 in 2010/11–2013/14 and examines their performance on indicators of college and career readiness and early college success.